What’s in the INDCs?

In the run up to this year’s U.N. climate conference in Paris, almost every nation in the world submitted a plan for how they will work to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to climate change. These plans, called “Intended Nationally Determined Contributions,” or INDCs, lay out each country’s commitments, and are the starting point for climate negotiations. As of today, 185 countries, representing 97.8 percent of global emissions, have submitted such documents.

So, what’s in the INDCs? According to most experts, the commitments are much better than nothing, but they still fall far short of what we need. For a more detailed reading of what each INDC says, you can read WRI’s great summary of each country’s pledges. Also, if you want to explore these documents a bit more, you can use the map below — a very basic tool that I built to search the INDCs for different words. Want to find out which country mentioned “coal” in their INDC? Or forestry? Or nuclear power? Type away below and find out.


Countries whose INDCs were not in English (or who had their INDC in a format that prevented searching) are shown in light gray. Countries without an INDC are in dark gray.

Obviously, this search tool won’t tell you anything about what different countries say they are going to do about coal or nuclear power. To do that, you’ll have to read the documents yourself.

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